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If there's a teaching statement, why write three more teaching paragraphs in your letter as well? Give me a quick snapshot and signpost where the rest of the information can be found, for example: Further details, including funding and publication plans related to the project, are included in my research proposal. There is no reason why your cover letter should need to go beyond two sides. In fact, I've seen plenty of people get shortlisted for fellowships and lectureships using a cover letter that fitted on to a single side of A4.

It can be done — without shrinking the font and reducing the margins, neither of which, I'm sorry to break it to you, is an acceptable ruse. Besides, please have some sympathy for your readers: In almost every conceivable kind of academic application, fellowships included, it's very high risk to write about your research in such a way that it can only be understood by an expert in your field.

It's far safer to pitch your letter so that it's comprehensible to a broader readership. You need to show a draft of your letter to at least one person who, as a minimum requirement, is outside your immediate group or department. Do they understand your research? Crucially, do they understand its significance?

Before the selectors can care about the details of what you do, you have to hook their interest with why you do it. I look particularly at secondary school children [why? My PhD is the first full-length study of this topic [so what?

However, young people aged who self-identify as LGB are more likely to experience verbal and physical bullying, and they are at significantly greater risk of self-harm and suicide.

In my dissertation, I conduct an ethnographic study of a large metropolitan secondary school, in order to identify the factors which lead to homophobic bullying, as well as policies and initiatives which LGB young people find effective in dealing with it. Be aware that "nobody has studied this topic before" is a very weak justification for a project. Nature may abhor a vacuum, but academia does not. Does it even matter that no previous scholarship exists on this precise topic?

Perhaps it never merited all that money and time. What are we unable to do because of this gap? What have we been getting wrong until now? What will we be able to do differently once your project has filled this void? Avoid the temptation of list-making here, too.

You don't need to itemise each course you have taught, because I've already read this on your CV, and there's no need to detail every module you would teach at the new department. Similarly, you don't need to quote extensively from student feedback in order to show that you're a great teacher; this smacks of desperation.

A few examples of relevant teaching and the names of some courses you would be prepared to teach will suffice. You should also give me an insight into your philosophy of teaching. What do students get out of your courses? What strategies do you use in your teaching, and why are they effective?

When explaining why you want to join the department, look out for well-intentioned but empty statements which could apply to pretty much any higher education institution in the world. For example, "I would be delighted to join the department of X, with its world-leading research and teaching, and I see this as the perfect place to develop my career.

Deploy your research skills, use the internet judiciously, and identify some specifics. Are there initiatives in the department to which you could contribute, e. What about potential collaborators remembering to say what's in it for them? What about interdisciplinary links to other departments in the institution? It often feels like slim pickings when you're job hunting, and many people feel compelled to apply for pretty much any role which comes up in their area, even if it's not a great fit.

But you still need to make the most of who you are, rather than refashioning yourself into an approximation of what you think the selectors want. If you have a strong track record in quantitative research and you've spotted a job in a department leaning more towards qualitative methods, you might still decide to apply, but there's no point in trying to sell yourself as what you're not.

They'll see through it, and you'll have downplayed your genuine successes for no reason. Instead, make a case for why your achievements should be of interest to the department, for example by demonstrating how statistics would complement their qualitative work.

At the end of the day, the best way to get shortlisted is to highlight bona fide achievements that are distinctive to you. Steve Joy is careers adviser for research staff in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the University of Cambridge — follow him on Twitter EarlyCareerBlog.

Writing a smart cover letter can get your foot in the door, even if you have a weak resume. This guide will help you to write the best letter possible. Are you looking for a follow up email or letter instead? Check out our comprehensive Follow Up Guide. Be sure to use our checklist to easily find out what you may be missing on your letter. It is free to download. It is meant to:. See the example below: While the example above demonstrates the information you need to include in the section, there are various ways to format it.

Check out the cover letter templates below to get more ideas on how you can structure this section. You can easily avoid this problem by doing your research. In the first paragraph, begin by telling the employer the position you are applying for and how you learned about the opportunity.

The rest of this paragraph should briefly present basic info about yourself, including: The second paragraph should respond directly to the job description written by the hiring manager. To make that easier, you can and should literally include words and phrases from the job description in your cover letters. To go the extra mile, do some research about the company, and try to find out what they are doing — and why — given the current state of their industry.

In a third paragraph, explain how you can fit into that schema, and help push the company forward and achieve any goals you suspect they may have. Thank them for spending the time to read your letter. Applicant tracking systems are mostly designed to read through resumes, sifting through keywords and key-phrases to statistically determine whether to let you through to the next stage. You might as well be completely prepared. Yes, someone will read it.

Will they read it carefully? It depends on the hiring manager. To write these cover letters, all you have to do is fill in the blanks that look like [this].

My name is [your name]. I am thrilled to be applying for the [position] role in your company. Given these requirements, I believe I am the perfect candidate for the job. While working on academic and extracurricular projects, I have developed proven [insert soft skills] skills, which I hope to leverage into the [name of open position] role at your company.

After reviewing my resume, I hope you will agree that I am the type of positive and driven candidate that you are looking for. I am excited to elaborate on how my specific skills and abilities will benefit your organization. Thank you for the opportunity to apply for the [position] role at your company. Given these requirements, I am certain that I have the necessary skills to successfully do the job adeptly and perform above expectations.

While working on academic and extracurricular projects, I have developed proven [insert soft skills] skills, which I can leverage into the [position] role at your company. After reviewing my resume, I hope you will agree that I am the type of competent and competitive candidate you are looking for.

I look forward to elaborating on how my specific skills and abilities will benefit your organization. Given these requirements, I am certain that I can meet and exceed all expectations. I am a [insert positive trait] high school student [insert GPA] who has been consistently praised as [insert positive trait] by my teachers and peers. After reviewing my resume, I hope you will agree that I am the type of skilled and resourceful candidate you are looking for.

I look forward to elaborating on how my varied skillsets and abilities will benefit your organization. Please accept my application for the open [position] role at your company. After reviewing your job description, I believe that I have the necessary skills and abilities to fill the role.


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Tips for Writing an Academic Cover Letter Your initial challenge will be to pass through the Human Resources screening. Review each of the required qualifications included in the job announcement and compose statements containing evidence that you possess as many of the skills, credentials, knowledge, and experiences listed as possible.

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By TPII editor extraordinaire, Verena Hutter ~This is a continuation of our series on the Academic Cover Letter. Verena is walking us through the paragraphs of the cover letter.

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Cover Letters for Academic Positions The purpose of a cover letter is to introduce yourself and to demonstrate the fit between your background and the advertised position. THE BASICS A cover letter must accompany and be tailored to any application you . 6) Writing about your research: why, not what. In almost every conceivable kind of academic application, fellowships included, it's very high risk to write about your research in such a way that it can only be understood by an expert in your field. It's far safer to pitch your letter so that it's comprehensible to a broader readership.

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Academic cover letters should follow the typical business letter format. Make sure to include contact information, a salutation, the body paragraphs, a closing, and your signature. Even though most cover letters should stick to one page, an academic cover letter should be about a page and a half to. The job application letter, or the cover letter, is the most important part of your application. It’s the first thing a search committee member sees. Typically, a search committee member will read your materials in the following order: cover letter, C.V., letters of recommendation, writing sample or .